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Two Thin Coats Paints | Exclusive Duncan Rhodes Interview as Wave Two Launches on Kickstarter!

Last year saw the release of a brand new range of paints made from a collaboration between Trans Atlantis Games and Duncan Rhodes Painting Academy – And unless you have been living under a rock, you’ll know that the Kickstarter for the Two Thin Coats paint range was a massive success making over $1.1 million!

With the initial Kickstarter over, the first set of paints are now available to purchase in the wild (you can even pick them up for a discount from our affiliates over at Element Games and help support us too!). We were fortunate enough to be sent Wave 1 to review, and you can check out Matt’s thoughts right here. Safe to say, they’ve been a big hit at Sprues and Brews HQ with some of the smoothest coverage we’ve seen in a paint range and some outstanding metallic colours.

But today we have some super exciting news from Trans Atlantis Games and Duncan Rhodes Painting Academy – They have just launched the Kickstarter right now to for wave 2 of the range, expanding out with more colours, more metallics and even new glazes!

And even more excitingly, we were lucky enough to get the world exclusive interview about the new range and chat with both Peter Buxton from Trans Atlantis and Duncan Rhodes himself about the Kickstarter, what colours people will be able to pick up from Wave 2 and some hilarious insights into the process of creating the range and also just how fun it is to create names for the paints in the range!

You can check out the full interview below or over on YouTube and it is also part of this week’s Podcast which was released today!

But if you would rather read than watch or listen, we have the full transcript below – so grab a brew and settle back as we speak to the guys about Two Thin Coats Wave 2


Matt
So if you cast your mind back to episode 208, we had some special guests on the show, Mr Duncan Rhodes and Peter Buxton talking about Two Thin Coats paints. Well, guess what? The guys are back with some exclusive news. How are you doing, gentlemen?

Duncan
Very well, thank you very well, good to be here.

Peter
Yes, I’m doing fine as well. Thanks for having us on, guys.

Matt
Anytime. So, obviously, last time we were chatting about the first wave of Two Thin Coats paints, and I think you’ve got some news to share with us on the site today.

Duncan
Big news. Hey, Peter.

Peter
It is huge news, Duncan, huge.

Duncan
That’s right, spill the beans.

Peter
Yeah, go on. It’s your paint.

Duncan
It makes me feel all guilty. It’s our paint! There’s wave two, wave two everybody. 60 more paints.

Matt
It’s super exciting.

Duncan
Yes, we’re expanding the range. It’s a whole other 60, which is going to be done through a Kickstarter once again. And this is something that really fleshes it out. The original 60 is like the core body of it, the girders is the scaffolding, and this is the extra stuff that sort of fleshes out and allows you to basically just sort of stay within this range, basically, and just paint anything. So it’s really cool. It’s got lots of fun colours in it, lots of really useful colours, ones that now, I’ve been using them for a little while, I feel like I can’t do without them now.

Matt
So what kind of brought about wave two then?

Duncan
Well, we want to make a range of top quality paints, I think. I’d say that you agree, Peter.

Peter
I completely agree. Very high quality paints.

Duncan
Absolutely. And we chose the initial 60 that we were getting going with, that was like, it was a strategic choice to have those ones, because what they are, are the most useful paints that I tend to use, really. And so they were all selected to allow that. Bare bones. You can paint lots of stuff with these things and you can mix some colours to kind of get around things, but there are definitely gaps in it because that’s the necessity when you decide to do it in triads. Because they kind of force your hand to have, like, well, we’re not just going to have, like, one or two reds, going to have three and then three blues and three purples. But because those three have to sort of be in line with the same sort of colour, it means that there’s just gaps of things that are really obvious. So, for example, if anyone’s doing any World War II stuff, you need a variety of military greens, like olive greens, and in wave one, there aren’t any, whereas in wave two, there are loads. There’s no room for things like turquoise, as for, like, maybe magical effects or glowing effects, things like that.

Duncan
In wave Two, that’s what we’ve got. It means you can like for very common colour sometimes you want that bright popping highlights, take it out a bit further and wave Two, we can do really bright highlights. So it’s all cool, fun things that are going to be just useful all over the place, but like I say, it builds on top of what we had before.

Matt
Amazing. That’s really cool. I know, like I said, you can get around some of the missing colours with mixing, but having premixed stuff is just infinitely easier, isn’t it? Especially with the Triad as well, where you’ve got your base, your mids and your highs all ready to go. So what’s the plan? Kickstarter again, did you say? When does it all kick off?

Duncan
Go for it, Peter. you are the manager.

Peter
Yeah, it’s going to kick off on the 24th January. Hopefully it should all be full go by the time you hear this and everything will be great. But yeah, it’s going to run until the 9th February so we’re not going to be near as much time as we want. However, we have got great news is that after the Kickstarter we are going to be on Game Found for any late backers. Anybody wants to be on there, and of course you can put all your nice lovely little add ons there and order more sets if you want. Of course you’d want loads of sets but yeah, we’re also going to be providing a chance to get hold of Wave One as well, Kickstarter. So if anybody wants to have Wave One and Wave Two together because who doesn’t want 120 great paints then you also have the chance to do that as well.

Matt
That’s really cool. With the first kickstarter you had some fun unlockables and exclusive models and even some exclusive paints. Like there was a blood effect paint in there. Are there any plans for similar unlockables on this one?

Peter
There is for sure. I don’t really want to spill the secrets because we might be taking it a little bit different, but yeah, there’ll be some unlocks there. There’s some fun things that Duncan has been working on. Roger as well. We’ve got a few surprises in the background.

Peter
There might be some new paints that we might not have told you about yet, some experimental stuff. Duncan’s been donning his white lab coat on and bubbling away and doing that. And we think we’ve got some really cool effect paints that might not spoil a little bit that you guys are going to be able to get early access to.

Matt
Amazing. So I guess that segues quite nicely into. You guys have been quite involved in the creation of these colours and it’s not just a case of these off the shelf paints that you’ve just dumped your name on. You’ve been kind of actively involved in the creation, haven’t you done, Duncan?

Duncan
Absolutely, yeah. It’s been a very involved process. Translators were great about it, really, because when all of this started way back, even with Wave One, it was like, so we think of these paints and things like that and we’d reply, well, we think it’d be really cool if there’s a structure to it with this sort of system and things like that. And then the response was, that’s amazing. What colours do you want? How many can we have? And it sort of went from there. And so I was able to essentially select them all and mix them all. So I’d be creating like a set of samples and it would go from there. And then there’d be days where we’d be working on each one, one at a time, to adjust it, to make it appropriate to what we would want. So we’d see them all laid out and we go, well, we think this one should change things so much to alter. Sometimes they change completely. There are some cases where the original triad, we then took the darkest one and that became the middle one because it was lighter than we expected, and then an entirely new one would be created.

Duncan
There were some that I tried mixing out samples that when we were seeing them all laid out together, we were like, no, it’s just not quite what we want. So we sort of basically threw it out and said to the scientists who can explain paint to you in words that you understand, but not in the order that they say them, it’s like science, they explain it, but they’ll come back. So one of them was supposed to talk about the colours in a bit, but one is our highlight for red, which I don’t know what they did, but they came back with the reddest red that ever did red, like eye watering red. It was great to be that involved in it. So all of these paints were designed that way and aside from the colour, the actual properties of the paint were things that, again, I was allowed to pick. So I would give them samples of bases and things and I select which ones I liked and things, so it all came from there. So the properties of each one are things that basically I pointed to in the end and approved. So, yeah, as it turns out, they end up that they do, which I didn’t expect.

Duncan
But you know what? It’s great. I’m really happy with them. So, yeah, it’s been cool. They’re not just off the shelf, they’re all completely mixed, made from scratch, I guess.

Matt
That’s really cool. Did you kind of, I guess, background doing videos and painting, many, many models help inform that, then?

Duncan
Oh, yeah, it really does, because my speciality is army painting kind of stuff. I encounter and deal with lots of people getting into the hobby. And when you first walk into a paint range and just see it all laid out by all these potential colours, it’s really confusing. So it was, is that that informed the idea of creating these paints and triads so that, as you understand okay, so you basically want to have highlights and things and shading and stuff. All right. So these colours are sort of laid out, so I can follow that. But as you gain confidence, you’ll then, of course go and do whatever you want and play around them however you want, which is what we intend. But yeah, the sort of areas where I’ve been working, I realised I joined the TV studio ten years ago now, which feels a bit scary. All of that doesn’t form the whole reason why it is formed in the way that it is.

Matt
Amazing. Well, you’ll tell us about some of the colours. I know you’ve got quite a few new triads and then some exciting new stuff like Glazes in there as well.

Duncan
Okay, where should we start, Peter?

Peter
Well, we could start the top.

Peter
At Number 61, which is my favourite. Yeah, we split it out a bit differently this time Duncan haven’t we, we’ve got some Triads, but when Duncan was developing this, Duncan, Roger, were developing this, I think to say you’ve really expanded on the idea of the range and you’ve gone beyond where we all thought we would ever be, really. So there’s some other exciting stuff at the bottom. So I think we’re going to start with some pinks.

Duncan
Yeah. With the triad. So, yeah, we’ve got some regular Triads, just like in Wave one. And there are 13 lines, if I believe correctly. So that’s what, 39 paints. And these are like before, but it’s completely new tone. So, yeah, we start out with a pink and this goes quite bright pink. So we had burgundy and Wave one, but we kind of went up to a lighter one, stuff that looks really good for cloaks and things like that. But this takes it further. This is like right into the pink. So things like you might want to have like, the gums of some monster inside the mouth and things like that, but then it goes really bright. So anyone who’s looking to, I don’t know, paint some space soldiers that like guitars and things. This is good, right? Because it goes really bright. I remember Roger challenging me to see how bright we could go on this. And we went very bright on the lightest one.

Peter
I was going to say I’ve been using the pink to paint tongues if you want it to look really pink and icky.

Duncan
Yes. Especially the sharp highlights on the very end of Neo pink.

Peter
Yeah, neopink. Amazing paint, amazing pink.

Duncan
Next up, we’ve got ones that I was very keen to get in. These originally sort of were in Wave One, but it just wasn’t quite we were making compromises on the reds that we had there, so we thought we’d save it until later. And this is more of maroon, reds. I really like these sorts of colours. They’re ones that I find look just really regal, really rich. They’re great for cloaks and things and red armours and that sort of stuff. But they’re always useful because if you’re painting, just say, for example, a dude on the horse, you want it to look well, the horse gear and everything to be well maintained. It’s a beautiful red to do for saddle cloths and things like it’s just really you. I find I just put in this colour in just about everything I paint. So we made a full triad around it. So really nice maroon kind of tones that start to go more towards pastely sort of colour as a highlight. Next up, we got some turquoise. This is the one that Roger was very keen on because he loves these sorts of tones. So we’re thinking of kind of magical effects with this sort of set of colours.

Duncan
So they’re nice and bright, nice and sharp, very punchy and yeah, we’re very well on glowing parts and guns and that sort of thing. This is followed up by another set that I was really keen on. And again, these are ones that were sort of in Wave One, but again, it was a compromise, so we saved it to Wave Two. And that is these blues, royal blues, really deep blues. So these are different from the ones we had before and that these are more rich. So, again, these work very well for things like cloaks and fabrics and that sort of thing. So nice and deep sort of colours. Then we’ve got the first of what I consider to be a skin tone triad. And this is for sort of Orks and Goblins sort of colours. Now, I think people are going to be really interested in these ones.

Peter
I would say that these are my particularly favourites, mainly because of the one in the middle.

Jason
Retro appeal.

Matt
Is the one in the middle a close match? Because I think a lot of people might be interested in that one.

Duncan
Some might say. Yeah, there were some particular tones that we had a lot of requests for back when all of this was starting and everything like that. And this is again one that we basically we wanted to set tones like they status like the greens, the more fleshy kind of greens they got a little hint of bone kind of colour in there. And this is again something we wanted to have a wave one, but we couldn’t fit it in so we thought we’d do it properly and do a whole triad based around these. And they look great, don’t they? They look really nice. They do.

Peter
I’ve not painted an Orcs using any other type of green since these have come out, especially guitar playing orcs as well.

Duncan
When I talk about the properties of paint, I’m sure everyone’s aware of some colour that they’ve tried using in the past to paint an army where it’s like a major colour of it and the paint will feel thick, but it just doesn’t cover very well, you know what I mean? It’s just frustrating to use and even though you’d add a touch of water to it to thin it down and stuff like that and you’re like oh my God, I’ve got to do coat, I have to coat, I have to coat, it’s starting to go lumpy what am I doing wrong? Greens are something that I’ve encountered a lot of that in the past. And so when it comes to ones like this, with these orkish sort of colours, I was very keen on making sure that they did cover really well. And thank goodness they do. So they’re just a joy to use. They’re just really, really fun, really easy, I would say you can get an even coat, smooth coat, very quickly, very easily, with no fuss. So I’m really proud of those ones. And same is true of the next two lines, which are I think of as the military greens.

Duncan
And we’ve got two tones here. This is because it’s quite weird when you think about painting miniatures and things, it goes into military things and there’s also landscapes and things, and there’s also magical sorts of things. And you realise, actually, green is really common colour in a range, because there’s so many potential kinds of green that you can have. And I didn’t really think about this when we were starting to do this, but yeah, it really came out in wave two, when we realised we had loads of greens in there. Now, we ended up with two lines of military greens because they’re different sorts of military green here. The first line is more greyish green, the second line is more olive green. So when I talk about greyish green, I’m talking about things like German uniform. So if you think of World War II, that’s sort of the legendary feel. Grey, right? When you look at it, is it green, is it grey? And that’s what this line is all about so this is great for things like Elven cloaks that’s what I’ve been doing recently, I’ve been painting some wood elves, and these are ideal for getting that sort of blend into the surrounding kind of cloak going on.

Duncan
The one after that are the ones that we had tonnes of fun naming. So these are Fury Green, Gung Ho, Green and Green Beret.

Matt
Genius.

Peter
No prizes for guessing what you paint. Those.

Duncan
Fury Green is basically ideal for painting U.S tanks, you might say. And Gung Ho green is a little bit lighter. This is the one I used to paint some my own tanks, some Flames of War British tanks, and they are all gung ho green. And then Green Beret is a lighter one, so it’s a nice highlight for all these. So I think these ones are going to be really popular.

Peter
Yeah, I think so too. I’ve really enjoyed paying Sherman’s, but I’ve gone a bit more American, a bit darker with fury green and using a cobbled grey to highlight them, which is the highlight from the grey green as well. Just to get a different tone than you would do with the more British kind of green that was around there. It’s more the overgrowth and incidentally as well. I’ve also used cobalt grey for flesh, dead flesh. Happy little accident that was.

Duncan
That’s cool. These are great. Really happy with these. I think there’s going to be cool to see what people do with them. And then we’ve got some more greens, but this time it’s more jade greens. So this is hydro green, jade green and ghoul green. So these are like you’ve imagined, like painting gems or something like that, and you want that deep green in the stone, it’s that sort of thing. So, yeah, these ones are really nice tones.

Dave
Or ancient dinosaurs there Jay.

Jason
Yeah, there’s a couple of triads in here that jump out out at me for some lizards on there as well. Certainly this one as well.

Peter
The Hydro Green is one of my favourite colours anyway, because it’s like that dark jade. You could just use it for everything, for shading red, shading purple, for using behind a blue. You can get a cold tone in it, you can get a warm tone. Oh, it’s just when you use it, you’re just like, wow. Again, as Duncan was saying, with the greens, they just go on and they flow wonderfully and smoothly and you’ve got a nice coat to work from and yeah, it’s just a joy to use hydro green is. I’ve had a lot of fun with that one.

Duncan
Yes. And as you move on to jade and ghoul green, they just flow really well, don’t they? So if you look to do something with really sharp highlights, those colours, if you want to get that crystal appearance where it’s really sudden, as you move into the hearts, they can look almost shiny or reflective. They basically flow really well for that. This brings them onto our next triad, which is sort of dirty greys I would describe it, as slightly sort of brown, like earthy, sort of greyish kind of tones. So sort of like stone kind of colours. Now, the first one is called Ashen grey, and this one is very much inspired by another colour that a lot of people were asking us about. So, yeah, I think I’m curious to see what people think of that one. So it’s got a slight tone of green in it and it’s quite a strange, hard to pin down colour. But again, it’s one of those ones that’s really useful for doing things you want to blend into the earth, so cloaks and things like that. It’s great for that. And it shades down nicely when you put a black wash over it, too.

Duncan
And then this goes up through highlights getting brighter. So we’ve got Idolon grey and rodent grey. So great for dirty grey stones that you might want to do stone. Then we’ve got some browns. Now, these are quite bright, punchy browns as they go up through the highlights, but they start with a nice sort of nice medium warm brown, I guess that’s to say. And that is noble steed Brown. And this one’s great for painting horses, or you might call them Noble Steeds. These go through sort of more orangey tones. So we’ve got Brown and Satyr Brown for our highlights for that. Next up, we got some Ochre colours. Gizmo Fur, named after Roger’s little doggy, our security guard, bless him, barks at everyone and everything, and then he runs up to say hello. And then we get on to doing our two more triads of flesh tones. Now, these ones are specifically done as flesh tones all the way through, and we’ve got two on this stage, so we’ve got the first one, which is kind of Mediterranean kind of tone, like Southern Europe, I guess, northern Africa, that sort of thing.

Duncan
And then after that, we’ve got dark skin tones, like black skin. So these are going to be really fun. I’m really interested to see what people do with these because they’re really lovely tones that can really be combined in different ways along with the other flesh tones that we got already. So this is really going to flesh things out, if you’ll excuse the pun.

Peter
It’s great. The skin tones. I remember when we developing those, we put a lot of time and effort into getting them right, I think is the best way to start acting as they should and as you want flesh tones to do a bit similar to the ones that we did in the first Go. Dwarven flesh Elven flesh and Barbarian Brawn. And yeah, the amount of people, the feedback we’ve had on just on those original flesh tones is like, oh, my gosh, I can paint faces. Yeah, you can.

Duncan
These three colours, these are built with that same thing in mind. Yeah, you’re right. They were ones that we worked a long time on, weren’t they? Yeah, they were, but they come out great. And I’ve been painting some Republican Romans using these and I think it gives a really nice feel to them.

Peter
All our Romans in the studio are painted with those as well.

Duncan
Great. All right, so that brings us to the end of the main Triads. So the next ones are ones that this is something that Roger was wanting right from the very start, and that is to have super popping highlights for people to use. Now, when you’re on a Triad system, you are kind of constrained by having to try and cover sort of dark, medium light is general intent for each of these, but sometimes you just want to go lighter. And as Peter keeps telling me off for having and Roger, I apparently have a dark palette when painting things. Is this right, Peter?

Peter
He does, yes. I think it was one model of the first or second time and it’s like Roger, he always painted this dark. And Roger like, no, it happened recently. He’s gone through his dark phase.

Duncan
So, anyway, so these ones are six colours that are just bright highlights. So these are intended to work with the existing Triads of your primary colours and your secondary colours. These are ones that we intend that you’d use as that final little spot highlight on things. So, of course, we’re interested in what people do with them. I’ve been using them for some glowing things. So one of the sample models I painted to show these paints is a Space Marine. It’s a Hellblaster with the big plasma gun. And I’ve been using them on the glowing effect on top of the gun.

Matt
Oh, nice.

Duncan
And my favourite of these is Hell Spawn red. This is the one that we were talking about, I’m going to call him a scientist because that’s what it feels like. He just came back with the most red ever. When you put it next to other reds, they turn brown.

Peter
It is amazing. Like Duncan literally sat there and said, I need this to be more red.

Duncan
Yeah.

Peter
Okay. Then I came back and it was like, oh, okay. Yeah. That is well red.

Duncan
Yeah, it is red, but it’s red. Absolutely. The sample I sent through was just I just tried to make a lighter red and of course, you start to go into oranges and pinks.

Peter
Right.

Duncan
Just make it more red. And we just couldn’t get it right. In the end, he was just like, Hang on, let me go and do something. I don’t know how he did this. Some sort of dark magic to create it.

Dave
I was going to say, did he pray to the Chaos Gods or something?

Matt
It is called Hell Spawn red, isn’t it?

Peter
Clue is in the name!

Duncan
Yeah, we’re also very proud of the name Craven yellow.

Dave
I’ve got to say, how much fun did you have naming all these paints? Not just from this wave, but from the first wave, because it looks like you had a lot of fun.

Duncan
So much fun. Roger and I would do this as a driving in the car for one work reason or another. We just like the coming out with names and noted them down because we went along, we had more names that we couldn’t use. I started coming out with ones that were puns on movies and things. I’m not sure we get away with them. And one-liners from action heroes.

Peter
I need to shout out to the crew at Trans Atlantis as well, because we do have our own names, but it’s quite amusing sometimes you’ll be walking back and going, that paint is not called that.

Duncan
Yeah. So on to metallics. So we’ve got a small metallics here. Now, the nature of what we wanted to add didn’t really fit into triads this time. So what we did instead was just have a really nice variety of metallic tones that can be combined with what we’ve got already. So, for example, Dwarven iron is a really dark silver. So our Sir Coats silver is sort of like medium to dark, but this one’s darker than that. Same sort of thing with overlord brass is darker than Spartan Bronze, that sort of thing. My favourite out of these is tough to pick between Dwarven iron and platinum crown because platinum is a really lovely super bright platinum colour. So a great highlight to be doing white gold on things. How about you, Peter, do you favourite?

Peter
Well, it’s going to have to be Dwarven iron because now everything in the studio is painted with Dwarven iron since we found that one. But for me it’s got to be copper because the red in that metallic paint is just mind popping, it’s a beautiful paint, but it looks like copper is the best way to put it. But you use it and again, it’s just like oh, right, okay, that’s perfect.

Matt
I’m really looking forward to seeing these. I think out of the whole range the metallics were my favourites. Out of the Two Thin Coats range, not just from like the range, from any paint range. I think they’re excellent metals. So really looking forward to seeing these.

Duncan
Awesome. I’m glad you liked the original ones. These ones? Yeah. We had a lot of feedback on wave one about the metallics being so good. These ones are the same sort of properties. So what you have currently in the existing ones, these are the same feel, same style, same shininess and everything. It’s just more colours. So we’re really excited to see what people do with these.

This brings us on to washes. So we’ve added three new washes to this wave. We’ve got a red, a blue and a purple. And these are nice, deep, dark colours and these are ones that will tend to come in, I think, in more fantasy sort of uses like painting monsters and magical weapons and things like that. So, yeah, they’re going to widen out the potential of what there is right now and build on top of what we’ve got. And this is followed up by Glazes. Now, this is another interesting one. This is one where, again, we had loads of requests to do these, so yeah, we heard. And so here we go, six Glazes. So we’ve got red, yellow, blue, orange, green and purple. And these go on top of colours and essentially change the tone.

Duncan
They’ll look like a wash when you first see them, except they’re much brighter colours. And rather than settling into recesses, what they tend to do is stick on flatter areas and give you essentially a colour filter on to things. So what they allow you to do is to paint something with yellow, for example, and then put yellow glaze over the top of it. And what it does is intensify that yellow and make it more popping. Alternatively, what you could do is put a green glaze over it and start tinted towards being green. So these are really fun for painters who like enjoying playing around with colours and things. And I know you’ve been using these a lot, haven’t you, Peter?

Peter
I have been using the glazes. Everyone’s asking me, what’s the favourite thing about Wave, what’s the favourite thing they’ve got to come in? And it’s like I’m not going to tell you, because these are going to blow your mind when you see that they are absolutely amazing. We’ve got some examples that you’ll see on the Kickstarter as well, of some Sir Coates painted with them. And your eyes hurt when you look at the red and the green. It’s just that these are all pure undilated. Yeah, they’re just amazing. I went back and repainted all of my Orruks my yellow, red, yellow with the yellow glaze, and all you can see is the shields. It’s brilliant. Big sneaky Orks going through the swamps with a huge bright yellow shields.

Matt
I’m really looking forward to these too. Since other paint suppliers discontinued their Glaze ranges, I’ve got a few precious drops in a bottle that been clinging on too. Hopefully we should be able to replace them.

Duncan
Yeah, I remember hearing about that sort of stuff for years, people saving onto these bottles and things like that. Anyway, I think that’s a big request. I didn’t expect that when Wave One came along, but yes, give the people what they want. And there you go. 60 paints, all kinds of lovely colours.

Matt
Amazing. Very exciting. So, do you have any details on the kind of the Kickstarter kind of tiers that you’ve got this time round?

Peter
We’re keeping it simple this time round with the Kickstarter, we’re doing 60 paints of Wave Two, or you can have 60 paints of Wave one, or you can have all 120 paints.

Matt
Nice and easy.

Peter
Nice and easy. With the range being out there and establish now, we think that we’re in a good position for people to say, yes, we want these colours, and away you go, you get all of them. Again with Duncan, as he said at the beginning, is that this is more of a kind of I wouldn’t say an add on to wave one, but it’s probably more of a complete package, isn’t it, Dunc? That rather than, this is your black, this is your white

Peter
Looking at these colours, it feels like the range is complete. As complete as a paint range can be, I guess.

Duncan
Potential things that we can, other ideas and things that we could add, who knows, maybe in the future. But with these, it kind of becomes, what’s the phrase? It’s self sustaining. It could just paint anything just floating around in this standard of paint. And this has actually been an interesting thing, because my wife started painting miniatures all of a sudden. She just started doing it one day and she’s really got into it. And she has, of course, been dipping into my paint collection and she’s ended up just using one of these. And she’s been painting all kinds of things of all sorts of different types and stuff, and she just doesn’t go out of these colours now, so that’s good. But I’ve told her if there’s things that are missing that she thinks that we should do, she should tell me. So far, she’s not told me anything.

Matt
Amazing. So, obviously, on Kickstarter again, what were the ups and downs of the first Kickstarter? Is there anything you’re doing different this time around?

Peter
That is a question for me. Well, the downsides are the sleepless nights.

Duncan
I think a lot has been learned, hasn’t it?

Peter
Yeah, the lessons learned. We have tried to make sure that every time that we went, that we could have done it better. We think we have this time around with little things like knowing the lay of the land. I don’t want to go too much into the world in 2023 as it is now. It’s a different place. We think we’ve adapted to that. We think we can understand that there’s a lot more that we can control now in the process. For example, from this time last year, we didn’t have a manufacturing plant in Liverpool. This year we do now. So we’ve got all that under our control, as Duncan can attest for Wave two, it’s just gone so perfectly but smoothly, hasn’t it’s? Totally different. It’s like, all right, okay, we need to do this, we need to do that. We got so much prepared now because we know about it, because those lessons have been learnt.

Duncan
Fair to say with Wave One, it was held up with unexpected things constantly happening that have been dealt with during that process, which means now there’s basically a system that’s laid out, all the things that you wouldn’t expect, you wouldn’t really think about, like the long story that happened with the foam in which the paints were packed. Well now that’s there and it’s no longer a case of, right, sort this out now because all these crazy things are happening around the world having knock on effects and stuff. So it’s, it’s like the path’s already been trodden, hasn’t it, Peter?

Peter
I don’t want to make a sound as simple because it’s a huge logistical operation, but it’s almost like a cut and paste now. It’s like, oh, I did this last time, there we go, we just do it again. Repeat rather than going, oh right, okay, we got to solve this problem and this problem and this problem and this problem and this problem, et cetera. It’s a lot easier this time around, isn’t it? Isn’t it Dunc with the planning and stuff like that. It’s almost like second nature, we would say.

Duncan
Hopefully it’s going to go so smoother.

Matt
Pros at this now I’m sure

Matt
So do you have an expected release date then for the second wave?

Peter
It’s going to be six months from the end of the Kickstarter.

Matt
Amazing.

Peter
Yeah.

Matt
Thanks a lot for coming on and chatting us about the new paints, guys. Really excited to seeing what everyone does. Are you guys excited to see what the community does with these paints as well?

Duncan
Oh yeah. That’s the coolest thing. I’ll tell you. It’s surreal seeing out their normal situations and being used. It’s a very odd experience. I struggle to get my head around it. I think I just quantify it. Oh, it’s some of the paints that people are using and then you see my name on the side of it and freaks me out. Yeah. I think people are really going to enjoy them. I can’t wait to see what they do. I’m especially interested to see what starts happening with all the Glazes. I think people are going to have a lot of fun with those. Yeah, I hope people like them.

Matt
Amazing. What’s the feedback being generally for the first wave? I know where there’s been a few glowing reviews of the range, hasn’t there?

Duncan
Yeah. Thank goodness people like them. I think that stood out to me is on our website we will get people sending us emails in telling us about them and their experiences and things and a lot of them have been reflecting on something I was trying to explain in various podcasts and things back with Wave One in that the paints have a particular quality about them. They are basically just really high quality ingredients going to them and there’s things in there that are a little bit different to what people might be used to. So the result is they just go on silky smooth really nicely, they cover really well, they do exactly what I would hope a paint would do and this is consistent throughout the entire range. And so it’s not just like the certain colours, you know, are good and certain ones that you would rather avoid and go around the houses, try and get the result you want. All of them do what I would want them to do. And we started getting emails in saying that they suddenly understood what I was trying to explain and it’s difficult thing to get across, really, and I was just having to resort to saying, trust me, when you try one, you’ll get what I mean.

Duncan
And this is what a lot of the feedback was saying. So I was really proud and really relieved, frankly that people were saying that.

Matt
Yeah. You mentioned earlier about kind of the consistency of some colours, bones and yellows and oranges, sometimes a bit finicky to get right, but they just go on so nicely, I say. It’s hard to explain how smoothly they go on while retaining the kind of pigmentation.

Duncan
It was a key thing of the whole range right at the very beginning. It was honestly just as important, in some ways more important than the actual colours itself, getting it to do what you want it to do. And we’re really proud that it does it so well.

Matt
Amazing. Well, very exciting. Good luck for the Kickstarter guys. I’m sure it’ll be a massive success and, yeah, I can’t wait to paint some miniatures now.

Duncan
Thank you.

Peter
Thank you.


Thanks once again to Peter and Duncan for joining us and chatting about all the exciting things on the way from the podcast. All of us at Sprues & Brews are very much looking forward to the new range and we’ll be following the Kickstarter with eager anticipation! If you do want to pick up Wave 2 as soon as they are available then make sure to check it out here.

If you are new to the site, then we also have a Podcast which features more interviews, reviews and hobby news!

You can listen to the podcast below via Spotify, or alternatively you can download the podcast using your choice of podcast provider, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts and Amazon.

You can back the project here, and you can check out the current range of paints over at Duncan Rhodes Painting Academy. We interviewed Duncan and Peter regarding the original wave of paints on podcast episode 208, which you can listen to at this link.

TAG and DRPA provided Sprues & Brews free samples of Two Thin Coats Wave 1 for review purposes.

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